Black Viper’s Windows 7 Service Pack 1 Service Configurations

 Introduction

To continue my fine tradition of optimizing MS’s latest OS, I have here my findings to date. If you are looking for Windows 7 Retail information, you are almost in the right spot.

Before adjusting your service settings, ensure that your system has already installed all updates by “checking now” for any available updates via Windows Update. At this time, it is best for you to ensure that all services are set to the default values before updating your system.

Breakdown of all changes to date: Windows 7 Information Changelog.

I cannot possibly test all configurations extensively (meaning, each persons specific computer needs), but what I can offer is what “works for me” and the obstacles I have came across so you do not have to discover them on your own. If information on this page needs a revision or expanded, please feel free to comment below.

An * (asterisk) indicates changes from the default

Two ** (asterisks) indicates you can add or remove this service by:

  • Head to Start
  • Select Control Panel
  • Select Programs
  • Select Programs and Features
  • Select Turn Windows Features on or off

Three *** (asterisks) indicates optional services installed with Windows Live Essentials.

Four **** (asterisks) indicates changes from Retail (SP0) to Service Pack 1.

Notes for a Happier Computer and User

  • Do not use “msconfig” to disable services, type “services.msc” in the Run box instead or check this FAQ!
  • Before disabling any service, check out the service information about each by selecting the service name links provided.
  • Service settings are global, meaning changes apply to all users.
  • All of these services are “Standard” with Windows 7 Service Pack 1 and installed by default, by Add/Remove Windows Features, or installed via Windows Live Essentials. If you discover a service that is not listed here, another application, driver or program installed them. A few of the more common ones are listed here.
  • WLAN Autoconfig service is required for normal operation of your wireless network card. It is listed here as Manual due to most desktops not needing wireless access, but if you do have a wireless network card installed, it will be in Automatic by default.
  • Still unsure? Put your setting to “Manual” or the listing under “Safe.” Manual allows Windows 7 Service Pack 1 to start the service when it needs to (or when ever it feels like it), but not at boot up. Depending on your configuration, not all services will start when required while in “Manual” mode. If you find you need a service, place it in Automatic.
  • After adjusting your service settings, reboot your computer.
  • Before posting your question in the comments below, see if your question has been addressed in the FAQ!

Table Header Information

  • The columns are sortable. Select the column header to sort by that field.
  • DEFAULT ~ What MS thinks should be running on Windows 7 Service Pack 1.
  • “Safe” Configuration ~ This is the configuration that 95% of the people will be able to use with little or no side effects. It will also minimizes the amount of “errors” that is reported in the Event Viewer. This does not guarantee it will work for you, but if adjusting your services scares you, this configuration would be a good starting point.
    • 19 service settings have been changed from the default annotated by an (*) asterisk.
  • “Tweaked” ~ This is the configuration that I have developed to reduce the “Safe” services started, but maintain system security. This does not guarantee it will work for you.
    • 57 service settings have been changed from the default annotated by an (*) asterisk.
    • This configuration is a system that is still able to perform many LAN networking functions, such as file and print sharing, HomeGroup access and uses wireless networking (laptop) plus leaves several security related “features” like the Windows DefenderWindows Firewall and Windows Update active.
    • This configuration is not for a Windows Media Center PC. In this case, use “Safe”.
  • “Bare-bones” ~ WARNING!! ~ This configuration disables many built in features of Windows 7 Service Pack 1 as well as several security features.
    • 85 service settings have been changed from the default annotated by an (*) asterisk.
    • This configuration is not for a system that is directly connected to the internet as Windows DefenderWindows Firewall and Windows Update are disabled!
    • This configuration is not for a laptop system as wireless networking (as well as Defender and Firewall) are disabled and will not be able to counter attacks while roaming on some random wireless connection outside of the home.
    • This configuration is not for a system that internal network attacks are an issue. For example: Multiple PC’s with multiple family members and inexperienced users. For this situation, I highly recommend “Safe” to ensure network security and Windows Update compatibility.
    • This is not for a system that provides networked resources, such as printers, Media Center, and WMP library to other LAN connected computers.
    • Use this configuration at your own risk. It is only provided here as a reference for me to adjust my system setting. If you tweak your Windows 7 OS, use “Safe” unless you read and understand what you are doing.

Configuration Information

  • Automatic ~ With a service in this state, it will start at boot time. Some services, when no longer required, will also automatically stop when not needed. If you find you do not need a service, place it into Manual or Disabled.
  • Automatic (Delayed Start) ~ With a service in this state, it will start just after boot time. Some services, when no longer required, will also automatically stop when not needed. If you find you do not need a service, place it into Manual or Disabled.
  • Manual ~ Manual mode allows Windows to start a service when needed. However, very few services will start up when required in Manual mode. If you find you need a service, place it into Automatic.
  • Disabled ~ This setting will stop a service from starting, even if needed. Errors in the Event Viewer will show up complaining of that fact. Some services, while Disabled, will constantly complain. However, this situation is taken care of if placed in Manual. The service descriptions identifies those that should be in Manual vice Disabled.
  • “Started” ~ A service that either set to Manual or Automatic that is running by default at or shortly after boot time.
  • “Not Started” ~ A service set into Automatic that is not running by default at or shortly after boot time.
  • “Not Available” ~ A service that does not apply to the particular version.
  • “Uninstalled” ~ The ability to uninstall a service that I recommend to be removed by using Add/Remove Windows Features.

Service Dependency Abbreviation Information

  • S ~ Windows 7 Starter
  • HB ~ Windows 7 Home Basic
  • HP ~ Windows 7 Home Premium
  • P ~ Windows 7 Professional
  • U ~ Windows 7 Ultimate
  • E ~ Windows 7 Enterprise

Service Default Registry Entries

  • These entries are exported directly from the registry of a default Windows 7 Service Pack 1 installation.
  • They are in the .reg file format (many entries are in hex notation), not as you would actually view the content via regedit.exe.
  • The particular location extracted is under: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\

An * (asterisk) indicates changes from the default

Two ** (asterisks) indicates you can add or remove this service by:

  • Head to Start
  • Select Control Panel
  • Select Programs
  • Select Programs and Features
  • Select Turn Windows Features on or off

Three *** (asterisks) indicates optional services installed with Windows Live Essentials.

Four **** (asterisks) indicates changes from Retail (SP0) to Service Pack 1.